On this page, you will find scholarly research related to rap on trial, including experimental studies which show the prejudicial impact of rap lyrics in criminal cases.

 

Rap Lyrics as Evidence: What Can Music Theory Tell Us? by Nicholas Stoia, Kyle Adams, and Kevin Drakulich (2016)

The Threatening Nature of “Rap Music” by Adam Dunbar, Charis E. Kubrin, and Nicholas Scurich (2016)

Rapping Honestly: NaS, Nietzsche, and the Moral Prejudices of Truth by Mukasa Mubirumusoke (2016)

R. v. Campbell: Rethinking the Admissibility of Rap Lyrics in Criminal Cases by David M. Tanovich (2016)

Rap Music and the True Threats Quagmire: When Does One Man’s Lyric Become Another’s Crime? by Clay Calvert et al. (2015)

Rap as Threat? The Violent Translation of Music in American Law by Lily E. Hirsch (2014)

Rap on Trial by Charis E. Kubrin and Erik Nielson (2014)

Poetic (In)Justice? Rap Music Lyrics as Art, Life, and Criminal Evidence by Andrea Dennis (2007)

The Freedom to Speak and the Freedom to Listen: The Admissibility of the Criminal Defendants Taste in Entertainment by Helen A. Anderson (2004)

Gangsta’ Rap and a Murder in Bakersfield by Stuart P. Fischoff (1999)

Who’s Afraid of Rap: Differential Reactions to Music Lyrics by Carrie B. Fried (1999)

Bad Rap for Rap: Bias in Reactions to Music Lyrics by Carrie B. Fried (1996)